Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier Review

Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier review
Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier, ISBN 9781844080380, 441pp

I just re-read Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier for the first time in a long time and it’s still an amazing read. It made me into a Daphne du Maurier fangirl all over again. Sometimes when I re-read a book I feel differently about it but with this book I was left with so much appreciation of Daphne du Maurier’s skill as a writer. Rebecca is truly a masterful piece of writing. It’s easy to see why this book has become a classic that has never gone out of print. Continue reading

The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy Review

The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy review
The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy, ISBN 9780241341339, 275pp, June 2018 Penguin English Library edition

If you’re looking for a classic that’s great fun, swashbuckling and has a mysterious hero at its heart then The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy is the book for you. Where else can you find a group of dashing Englishmen led by the Scarlet Pimpernel who rescue French aristocrats from the guillotine during the French revolution and say things like “Zooks!,” “Demmed excitable little puppy” and “Odd’s fish.”

The beauty of this book is that no one knows the identity of the dashing Scarlet Pimpernel, but the French are desperate to find out who has been performing these miraculous rescues that make them look like fools. After each rescue they find his calling card marked with a red flower, the Scarlet Pimpernel… Like the French agents, the reader has to guess the Scarlet Pimpernel’s identity. Continue reading

Heidi by Johanna Spyri Review

Heidi by Johanna Spyri
Heidi by Johanna Spyri, ISBN 9780147514028, Puffin in Bloom edition

The classic children’s book Heidi by Johanna Spyri is a delightful story which I re-read recently. I was given this gorgeous Puffin in Bloom edition for Christmas (see picture). I couldn’t remember anything about Heidi as I had last read it more than twenty years ago. So it was great to revisit this story as an adult.

If you’re not familiar with this classic, it’s a simple story about a little girl named Heidi who goes to live with her grandfather, Uncle Alp, in the Swiss Alps. There she lives a peaceful existence, frolicking around the mountainside with Peter the goat-herd and all the goats. Then Continue reading

North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell Review

North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell is one of my all-time favourite classics. I also love the BBC period drama from a while ago starring the dreamy Richard Armitage. I don’t think I have told you before how much I love these BBC adaptations of classics. Anyway… Set around 1851, North and South has often been referred to as Pride and Prejudice with a social conscience. It is a love story at its core but also explores the differences between the agricultural South of England and the industrialised North and the lives of factory workers.

North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell, penguin classic

North and South tells the story of Margaret Hale, the daughter of a parson, who enjoyed a genteel upbringing in the southern England countryside. When her father leaves the Church over a crisis of conscience, the family moves to the northern mill town of Milton in the north. A place far different from the rural South. Milton is a town in the throes of the industrial revolution.

At first Margaret hates the ugliness and dirtiness of Milton. But over time she sees Continue reading

Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier

Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again …

Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier (ISBN: 9781844080380, 440 pages, First published 1938)

With those words the haunting tale of Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier begins. Reading this book again, after so many years, reconfirmed why Daphne du Maurier is one of my favourite ‘classic’ authors. Written in the 1930s, it is a story that will still enthrall a reader of today.

Rebecca is told from the perspective of a young woman whose name we never learn.  We meet her in Monte Carlo where she is employed as the ‘companion’ (slave) of a rich older lady. One day she  meets Maxim de Winter – a rich, much older Englishman who is master to a great English pile called Manderley. Maxim is in Monte Carlo to recover from the tragic drowning death of his wife, Rebecca.

After a whirlwind romance, conducted when the heroine’s boss is laid up ill in bed, Maxim asks her to become the next Mrs de Winter. Young and in love, she agrees and they return to England. There she finds Manderley, the beautiful, famed estate by the sea. A place frozen in time.

The house is still furnished according to Rebecca’s tastes. The housekeeper, Mrs Danvers, runs the house and the servants as though Rebecca is still alive. Though Maxim never speaks of Rebecca, a change has come over him. It is though he can’t forget his first wife and is mourning her still.

The unnamed heroine is plain, shy and unable to stand up for herself. The servants walk all over her and she is terrified of social engagements. Her only friend seems to be the dog, Jasper. Everyone talks of Rebecca – her beauty; her style and wit; how she was the perfect wife and hostess. It isn’t long until the heroine has a fully fledged obsession with Rebecca. Daphne du Maurier slowly, but surely, tightens the strings of the story and you are left waiting for the heroine to snap.

Daphne du Maurier’s control over the tension is masterful. The heroine finds a used tissue in an old coat of Rebecca’s. Such a small thing gives the new Mrs de Winter a push closer to the edge. We are privy to her inner turmoil but her husband remains oblivious to his young wife’s dark thoughts as she constantly compares herself to Rebecca and sees nothing but her own inadequacy.

But then MAJOR PLOT TWIST and the story goes off in a direction that a first time reader won’t expect, and a returning reader will appreciate as the workings of a great writer. Now a different kind of pace builds and you find yourself wondering how Daphne du Maurier manipulated you into the corner you’re in.

It’s no wonder that Hitchcock made this into a film. It’s also no wonder that this book, written in the 1930s, was a hit in its day and has now entered the realm of being a modern-day classic.

The evocative language and thrilling plot make for page-turning reading. I wouldn’t be surprised if tonight I dream of Manderley …