Crimson Lake by Candice Fox Review

Crimson Lake by Candice Fox review
Crimson Lake by Candice Fox, ISBN 9781784758066, 405pp

I have to admit that I would never have picked up Crimson Lake by Candice Fox if not for the repeated recommendation from a bookstagram friend. Candice Fox is an Australian crime writer who has about eleven books under her belt, including a few co-written with publishing superstar James Patterson.

Don’t get me wrong, I do like reading crime novels by Australian authors — Jane Harper is my favourite — but I don’t read this genre too often and I have a “to be read” pile bursting at the seams. But my husband found me a second-hand copy of Crimson Lake and I was then out of excuses. I had to give Candice Fox a chance.

And my verdict? Crimson Lake is one of the best books I’ve read for ages. Continue reading

Paris for One by Jojo Moyes Review

Paris for One by Jojo Moyes review
Paris for One and other stories by Jojo Moyes, ISBN 9781405928168, 336pp

Paris for One is a short story collection by Jojo Moyes. I’m a big fan of Jojo Moyes but I don’t usually like reading short stories. I personally prefer novel length books to short stories as just when I start getting invested in the characters and plot BAM… the story ends.

BUT I really enjoyed Paris for One. Firstly, because I love the way Jojo Moyes writes and have read so many of her books over the years. Secondly, because it was a great collection of stories. And lastly, because dipping in and out of these short stories made for great reading at a time when I was finding it hard to concentrate on my reading. Continue reading

My Cousin Rachel by Daphne du Maurier Review

My Cousin Rachel by Daphne du Maurier review
My Cousin Rachel by Daphne du Maurier, ISBN 9781844080403, 335pp

My Cousin Rachel by Daphne du Maurier is a book I’ve been wanting to read for a long time. As part of my quest to read more Daphne du Maurier books this year, I finally got around to reading it.

The story is written from the perspective of Philip Ashley, a young man on the cusp of turning twenty-five who has a lot to learn about the world and a lot of maturing to do. Philip was raised by his cousin, Ambrose, after the death of his parents, and grows up on a beautiful estate in Cornwall. But Ambrose suffers from ill-health so must spend the winter months over in Italy where it’s warm. Continue reading

99 Percent Mine by Sally Thorne Review

99 Percent Mine by Sally Thorne Review
99 Percent Mine by Sally Thorne, ISBN 9780062439611, 339pp, Pub Jan 2019

I bought 99 Percent Mine by Sally Thorne to take on my holiday that’s coming up in March, but I couldn’t wait until then to read it. I loved Sally Thorne’s first book The Hating Game and had high hopes for this book. Before I go into my thoughts on 99 Percent Mine, I’ll just tell you a little bit about the plot.

Darcy Barrett is a girl in crisis. She’s working at a rough biker bar after her photography business collapsed. She has her eye on the next plane to somewhere exotic, if she could just find her passport. And she’s ignoring her dodgy heart which she really needs to go and get checked out, except she’s not talking to her twin brother Jamie who always goes with her to these appointments. Continue reading

Becoming by Michelle Obama Review

Becoming memoir by Michelle Obama
Becoming by Michelle Obama, ISBN 9780241334140, 426pp

Becoming by Michelle Obama is a bit of a departure from my usual reading material. I rarely read biographies and when I do they are usually written by female comedians and are full of laughs. But Becoming hooked me from page one. It was written with so much warmth, personality and wisdom. I loved learning more about Michelle Obama’s life and getting a peek into what it was like living in the White House and being the First Lady of the United States.

I remember watching President Barack Obama’s first inauguration on TV. I was living in the UK at the time and it was one of those moments that I knew I’d remember forever. Even though I am Australian, it was just such an historic moment to see America elect their first African-American president. Since that time, I have always been fascinated by the Obamas.

Continue reading

The Hound of the Baskervilles Review

The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle review
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle, ISBN 978014199177, 189pp

One of my reading goals for 2019 is to read more classics. Last year I planned to read a huge pile of classics but unfortunately only ended up reading a handful of books in this category. This year I’m determined to read as many of my classics as I can.  The Hounds of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle is my second classic novel of the year. It features the wonderfully eccentric, brilliant Sherlock Holmes and his sidekick Dr Watson. Continue reading

An Anonymous Girl Review

An Anonymous Girl by Greer Hendricks book review
An Anonymous Girl by Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen, ISBN 9781529010725, 371pp

I’m trying to sort out my thoughts after reading An Anonymous Girl by Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen. This is their second book (I read their first book The Wife Between Us last year) and I have to say it wasn’t as good as their debut. But it was still a fast-paced thriller which had me burning through the pages to get to the end.

An Anonymous Girl is about twenty-something Jessica who is a struggling makeup artist living in New York. Money is an issue for her as she is paying for her disabled sister to get therapy (unbeknown to her parents) as well as trying to pay rent and bills.

When Jessica hears by chance about a psychology study that is paying great money for young female participants, she seizes the chance to participate. She then finds herself sucked into a study about ethics and morality run by the mysterious Dr Shields. Soon the study becomes more and more intrusive and starts to take over Jessica’s life. Who is Dr Shields and what is the secret agenda behind the study? Continue reading

The Wicked King by Holly Black Review

The Wicked King book review
The Wicked King by Holly Black, ISBN 9781471408038, 322pp

I never know how to review books that are part of a series. I tend to only review the first book in a series and then make vague references to the following books because I don’t want to spoil anything for new readers. So I’m going to tread very lightly (and vaguely) as I review The Wicked King, the second book in a YA fantasy series by Holly Black. I read the first book The Cruel Prince about this time last year. I’ve also read other books by Holly Black including Tithe. In case you don’t know, this series is all about faeries, and the few mortals living with them, and is set in the Shifting Isles of Elfhame.

The main protagonist is a human girl named Jude. Her mother was once in a relationship with a faerie general named Madoc, but she ran away from him into the mortal world when pregnant with his child (Jude’s older sister). Jude is completely human, as is her twin sister. When Jude was a child, Madoc came and killed their mother and then took all three sisters to Elfhame. Being mortal in a faerie realm is not a good thing so Jude has had to learn to be sneaky, dangerous and as cutthroat as the faeries around her. Continue reading