Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi

Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi book review
Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi. ISBN 9780241975237, 305pp

Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi is such an amazing novel with beautiful writing and powerful themes. It starts in 18th century Ghana and tells the stories of two sisters – Effia and Esi. Effia is married to a white British soldier who works in slavery at the Cape Coast Castle. Her sister Esi, who she never learns about and who grew up in another village, ends up being captured and sold into slavery and is taken by ship to America to work on a tobacco plantation. Continue reading

The Governess Game by Tessa Dare Review

The Governess Dare by Tessa Dare review
The Governess Game by Tessa Dare ebook, 384pp, Pub August 2018

I automatically buy Tessa Dare‘s books as soon as they come out. She is one author whose books I love to read and I’ve read them all. So when The Governess Game was released the other week I just had to buy it on my kindle.

Tessa Dare writes historical romance and her books are pure entertainment. If you like reading books about sexy Dukes, rakes and cads and independent, feisty, take charge women, then you will like these books.

The Governess Game tells the story of Alexandra Mountbatten, a comet chasing, clock-winder spinster who goes for an interview to wind up the clocks in the home of Chase Reynaud — a rakish libertine who is in line to inherit a Dukedom. Continue reading

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr Review

All the Light We Cannot See Review
All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr, ISBN 9780007548699, 531pp

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doer is a book I’ve been hearing about for ages that everyone raves about. So when I saw it in a second-hand bookstore recently, I just had to grab it. My expectations were huge going in to read this book and I have to say that it mostly lived up to all the hype.

Set during World War II it tells the story of a young, blind French girl named Marie-Laure who must navigate war-torn France and all its dangers without being able to see them. Her father works at the Museum of Natural History in Paris and helps Marie-Laure find her way around by carving a replica of the city streets for her to memorise. Continue reading

Pachinko by Min Jin Lee Review

Pachinko by Min Jin Lee book review
Pachinko by Min Jin Lee, ISBN 9781786691378, 537pp

I have struggled for a few weeks to find a good book to get into. I kept starting books and then abandoning them. I don’t think it was the books at fault, just my own strange reading mood. Then I picked up Pachinko by Min Jin Lee and suddenly I was back into reading. I couldn’t put this book down until I had made it to the end.

Pachinko is a historical fiction saga that takes place over a few generations of a Korean family living in Japan. Starting in South Korea in 1911 in a fishing village in Yeongdo, it moves through to Osaka in Japan and the Second World War and finishes up in Tokyo in 1989. Continue reading

The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah Review

The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah review
The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah, ISBN 9781250072252, 440pp

Why did I wait so long to read this wonderful book? I had seen The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah being raved about for years and for some reason I never read it. It was only when I visited my parents’ place and saw this book on their shelf that I finally decided to give it a go. Even then it sat in my to be read pile for ages, alone and unloved, until I picked it up recently and started reading. And then I couldn’t stop until I had read it all. Continue reading

My Love Affair with the Outlander Series

I discovered the Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon years ago when I was at university. It remains one of the defining moments in my reading life to date. I can still remember the absolute pleasure it was to read about Jamie and Claire for the first time. I often wish I could go back to this first time so I could be surprised all over again. This book fulfilled a lot of my reading loves: historical fiction, romance, adventure, a bit of fantasy and I loved all the medical aspects portrayed through Claire’s character.

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The Wintercombe Series by Pamela Belle Review

If you are looking for a great historical fiction series packed with intrigue, family issues and a little bit of romance, then I have the series for you. I first discovered the Wintercombe series by Pamela Belle about fifteen years ago. I picked up Wintercombe in a second-hand book store and then later its sequel Herald of Joy. I lost both books in a house move and then spent years trying to find them again. To my delight, I discovered that both books were available as ebooks this year and I bought them immediately. And I also discovered book three A Falling Star and book four Treason’s Gift.

Wintercombe is set during the English civil war in the 17th century and tells the story of its namesake, Wintercombe, a beautiful manor house in Somerset where Puritan Lady Silence St Barbe lives with her two step-children Rachael and Nathaniel and three children Tabitha, Deb and William. Her Parliamentarian husband is off fighting in the war. Silence is the perfect Puritan wife to her much older husband and lives a quiet, godly existence.

The English Civil war has been raging for two years when a detachment of Cavaliers is sent to garrison at this country house. Not having anywhere to take her children, and not wishing to let her house and beloved gardens be destroyed by the enemy in her absence, Silence elects to stay for the occupation.

Captain Nick Hellier is the second-in-command of the enemy Royalist soldiers and is, at first, not someone Silence is willing to trust. But compared to the brutish Lieutenant-Colonel Ridgeley who is evil incarnate, Captain Hellier is mild mannered. He soon becomes someone Silence can go to for help, despite being an enemy, as he does his best to protect her and the children from Ridgeley’s wrath. Amidst all the turmoil of war, Silence begins to break free from the constraints around her and allow music, laughter and love into her life in the form of Nick. Continue reading

The Duchess Deal by Tessa Dare: A Review

The Duchess Deal by Tessa Dare
The Duchess Deal by Tessa Dare, Kindle edition, published August 2017, purchased from Amazon

This is a quickie review for a satisfying and entertaining historical romance ebook I read in under 24 hours. The Duchess Deal is the latest release from Tessa Dare, an author who I happily stumbled upon a couple of years ago. Since then I have read all her books. Yes, there are steamy sex scenes in The Duchess Deal as per this genre and there is also a feisty heroine and a physically and mentally scarred Duke, but there are also laughs, drama and romance which is what always keeps me coming back to this genre when I just want a fun read.

Set in London sometime after the Battle of Waterloo, The Duchess Deal tells the story of a brooding, scarred from battle, Duke of Ashbury (a kind of beast-like figure) who was cruelly abandoned by his fiancée due to his disfigurement and has become a recluse. He is not the nicest of men as a result and drives his servants crazy by being demanding, rude and never leaving the house. But Ashbury decides it is time he does his duty to the title and find a wife to impregnate and then send off to a house in the country once she is with child. Afterall, who could love a hideous beast like him? Continue reading