The Shining by Stephen King Review

The Shining by Stephen King book review
The Shining by Stephen King, ISBN 9780450032202, 447pp

The Shining by Stephen King was my third King read in October and the scariest! Things that go bump in the night and me don’t usually get along. I don’t like scary movies so I approached this book cautiously. And while I found it all kinds of scary, it was also a damn good book and a great example of suspense in a cabin fever setting.

The Shining is about a family of three: Jack Torrance, his wife Wendy and their extraordinary five-year-old son, Danny. Jack is a man with issues. He’s a writer and was a university teacher until his drinking and violent behaviour sees him lose his job. A friend pulls some strings and gets him a caretaker job at the Overlook Hotel, high in the Colorado Rockies. Jack and his family are to live in the empty hotel when it’s shut down over the winter. Empty of guests and employees, it’s just the three of them in a huge hotel that has a colourful and scary past. It’s a place where there have been many violent incidents over the years. It’s also a place that gets cut off from the world as the snow blocks all the roads allowing no one in or out.

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The Green Mile by Stephen King Review

The Green Mile by Stephen King book review
The Green Mile by Stephen King, ISBN 9780743210898, 399pp

The Green Mile by Stephen King was my fourth Stephen King read in October. It was also my favourite. Although I saw the movie long ago, I had forgotten what happened. So it was great to read the novel and rediscover the story.

The Green Mile was first released as six serial installments over 6 months in 1996 like Charles Dickens did back in the day. (You can see in the photo that my husband collected the originals). It was a huge publishing risk at the time as publishers didn’t know if readers would embrace the formats or want to keep buying the installments. Continue reading

Misery by Stephen King Review

Misery by Stephen King Review
Misery by Stephen King, ISBN 9780340920961, 368pp

My husband owns a huge Stephen King book collection and has been bugging me for ages to read some more King books. So, at the start of October I picked up the classic Misery to read. Misery is actually a good choice for a keen reader and writer like myself as the protagonist is a bestselling author who wakes up after a car accident to find himself with broken legs lying in the bedroom of his number one fan. This fan is Annie Wilkes, an ex-nurse who lives on a rural property and just loves author Paul Sheldon. Paul is known for his series of books about a character named Misery. Misery has made him a fortune, but in his last book he killed her off so he can move on in his writing. But Annie doesn’t like this one bit and she’s not going to let Paul leave until he writes a new book that brings Misery back to life. Continue reading

Carrie by Stephen King Book Review

Carrie by Stephen King book review
Carrie by Stephen King, I read an edition not pictured ISBN 9780340920947, 242pp

Carrie by Stephen King is one of those classic King books that everyone has heard about – or they’ve seen the movie. This month I decided to raid my husband’s Stephen King collection and try some of this author’s earlier books. Carrie was Stephen King’s very first published novel and it almost wasn’t published after Stephen threw his draft away. Luckily, his wife found it in the trash, dusted it off and urged him to keep working on it. And the rest is history. Continue reading

The Giver of Stars by Jojo Moyes Review

The Giver of Stars by Jojo Moyes Review
The Giver of Stars by Jojo Moyes, ISBN 9780718183233, 440pp

Regular readers of my blog will know how much I love anything written by Jojo Moyes. So I was excited to get my hands on her latest release The Giver Of Stars. I pretty much devoured this historical fiction book set in 1930s Kentucky in a day. I just couldn’t put it down!

Set in Baileyville, Kentucky, during the Depression, it tells the story of a remarkable group of women who form part of the WPA’s horseback mobile librarian programme – bringing books and reading to people living in remote mountain areas.

Though the characters in this book are fictional, they are inspired by the real life women who took part in this scheme which ran from 1935 to 1943. Jojo weaves a fascinating tale of a small community where many welcome the spread of books and reading, while others oppose the idea of women promoting literacy. Continue reading

Night Music by Jojo Moyes Review

Night Music by Jojo Moyes book and review
Night Music by Jojo Moyes, ISBN 9780340895955, 407pp

Night Music by Jojo Moyes joins a fast growing list of books I’ve read by Jojo. It all started when my husband decided to add to the few Moyes books in my collection by tracking down second-hand copies of her other books. Now I have ten of her books!

Night MusicĀ is a story about grief, family, music and house renovations. Isabel Delaney is a recently widowed violinist with two children. She’s always taken a backseat in parenting as she was travelling around playing in orchestras while her husband looked after the kids. Following his death, she finds out that her family is in a mountain of debt and they can no longer afford their mortgage or the children’s nanny. Continue reading

Foreign Fruit by Jojo Moyes Review

Foreign Fruit by Jojo Moyes Review
Foreign Fruit by Jojo Moyes, ISBN 9780340834145, 483pp

Jojo Moyes is an automatic buy author for me. Foreign Fruit has been sitting on my bookshelf for quite some time, so I was happy to finally get around to reading it. Set in the 1950s and present day (early 2000s), Foreign Fruit takes place in the seaside town of Merham. It’s a place where people don’t like change — even when it’s greatly needed.

In the 1950s section of the book we meet two friends: Lottie Swift and Celia Holden. Lottie came to live with the respectable Holden family when London was evacuated during the war and then never went back to live with her mother. Continue reading

A Lifetime of Impossible Days by Tabitha Bird Review

A Lifetime of Impossible Days Tabitha Bird Book Review
A Lifetime of Impossible Days by Tabitha Bird, ISBN 9780143792260, 395pp

A Lifetime of Impossible Days by Tabitha Bird tells the unforgettable story of Willa Waters aged eight, 33 and 93. In 1965, eight-year-old Willa receives a mysterious box. Inside is a jar of water and the instructions: ‘One ocean: plant in the backyard.’ In doing so, Willa creates a time portal that allows her to visit her future selves.

In 1990, Willa is 33, a wife and the mother of two small boys. She’s dealing with dark memories from her tragic childhood. When she encounters her eight-year-old self in the garden it sends her spiralling out of control.

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