The Lost Man by Jane Harper

The Lost Man by Jane Harper review
The Lost Man by Jane Harper, ISBN 9781743549100, 366pp

The Lost Man is Jane Harper’s third novel and it’s her best book yet. I read this in 24 hours because I was hooked on trying to solve the mystery. I thought that The Dry was good, Force of Nature was even better, but The Lost Man is now my favourite.

This books tells the story of three brothers living on adjacent vast cattle properties in the middle of outback Queensland. It’s a place so remote that it takes three hours to drive to the nearest town and groceries are delivered every six weeks by a refrigerated truck. People drive around in cars packed with water, food, spare tires, fuel and radios because if you breakdown out here then help is a long way away and wandering anywhere in the harsh sun can lead to death in hours. One policeman looks after a territory the size of the state of Victoria. It’s an extreme environment full of heat and dust. Continue reading

Death Comes to Pemberley by P.D. James Review

Death Comes to Pemberley book review
Death Comes to Pemberley by PD James, ISBN 9780571283576, 310 pp

Death Comes to Pemberley by P.D. James is a continuation of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, but with a difference–it’s all about a murder. The action takes place six years after Elizabeth and Mr Darcy’s marriage. They are now the parents of two boys and set to host an annual ball. Jane and Mr Bingley arrive at Pemberley and join Colonel Fitzwilliam and Darcy’s sister, Georgiana. On the eve of the ball the peace at Pemberley is disturbed when a hysterical Lydia Wickham arrives unannounced, screaming that her husband George Wickham is dead.

Something sinister has happened in the woods near Pemberley which will drag Wickham back into Darcy and Elizabeth’s lives.

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The Ruin by Dervla McTiernan Review

The Ruin
The Ruin by Dervla McTiernan, ISBN 9781460754214, 380pp, Pub Feb 2018

The Ruin by Dervla McTiernan is a debut novel set in Galway, Ireland. I was sent a copy of this book for review by HarperCollins Australia and it sat in my to be read pile for a while. When I finally picked it up, I was instantly hooked by the writing and expert plotting. The Ruin very much reads like it should be book ten from a well-established author instead of a debut. I read mostly crime thrillers rather than police procedural novels, but I’ve read enough of this genre to know that this is a high quality example.

The Ruin has been compared to the bestselling The Dry (probably because Dervla and Jane Harper both live in Australia) but I think it’s very different from The Dry.

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The Wife Between Us Review

The Wife Between Us by Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen is clever and very twisty. Coming off the back of reading The Woman in the Window by A.J Finn, another psychological suspense thriller with an unreliable narrator, I wasn’t sure if I would enjoy this as much. But I did.

It’s hard to go into too much detail about this book as I don’t want to give anything away so I will quote the book’s blurb:

The Wife Between Us
The Wife Between Us by Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen, ISBN 9781509842827, 346pp, Pub Jan 2018

When you read this book, you will make many assumptions. It’s about a jealous wife, obsessed with her replacement. It’s about a younger woman set to marry the man she loves.

The first wife seems like a disaster; her replacement is the perfect woman.

You will assume you know the motives, the history, the anatomy of the relationships.

You will be wrong. Continue reading

The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn Review

The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn is a compelling page turner which I pretty much inhaled in one day, thanks to the short, punchy chapters. I just kept reading ‘one more chapter’ and before I knew it I had finished the book. It’s another book with an unreliable narrator — these books are so popular these days — and was like a cross between Girl on the Train and Hitchcock’s Rear Window. I also thought there was a smattering of Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine in there in terms of the main character struggling with depression and trauma alongside other things.

The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn
The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn, ISBN 9780008234164, 427pp, Pub Jan 2018

Without giving too much away, The Woman in the Window is narrated by Dr Anna Fox, a former children’s psychologist who suffered some trauma months ago and now has developed agoraphobia. She hasn’t been able to leave her New York house in ten months and exists on lots of prescription medication chased down with copious glasses of wine. Hence the whole unreliable narrator angle.

Watching her neighbours from her window is something of a past time. That and watching old black and white movies like Rear Window, Strangers on the Train and Vertigo. Continue reading

Force of Nature by Jane Harper Review

Force of Nature is the just released second novel from Jane Harper, author of the hugely popular bestseller The Dry. The two books are linked by the same main character, Federal Police Agent Aaron Falk, but this book takes place six months later and in a completely new setting.

Force of Nature by Jane Harper
Force of Nature by Jane Harper, ISBN 9781743549094, 377pp

I previously wrote a review about The Dry which I enjoyed but thought was a bit over hyped. I came to reading Force of Nature without big expectations as sometimes second books from an author suffer the dreaded second book syndrome (i.e. are a bit disappointing). Well, I have to say that I was pleasantly surprised by Force of Nature. It had an interesting premise that kept me intrigued and guessing all the way to the end. In some ways I liked it even better than The Dry.

Force of Nature is set in the rugged bushland of the fictional Giralang Ranges east of Melbourne. A group of five women go on a team building hike through the bush. But on the last day of the hike, only four women walk out. One of their group, Alice Russell, is missing. Continue reading

Into the Water by Paula Hawkins Review

Into the Water by Paula Hawkins was on my to be read list for quite a while. I picked it up a couple of times and then put it down as I found the first few chapters hard to get into. But eventually I ended up getting through it during a long car trip and it was a book that got better as it went along.

Into the Water by Paula Hawkins
Into the Water by Paula Hawkins
This follow-up book from the author of The Girl on the Train was probably never going to measure up to its predecessor’s success so I went into reading this without huge expectations.

Set in a small English town, it starts with the death of Nel Abbott, a single mother of a teenage daughter, Lena. Nel was obsessed with documenting the many drowning deaths of women in the local body of water called the Drowning Pool. Following Nel’s death, her sister Jules comes to town to take care of her niece and to try to reconcile her complicated feelings for Nel. They were not speaking when Nel died.

As the local police investigate Nel’s death, there is debate over whether this was a suicide or something more sinister. It’s the latest in a string of deaths that took place in the Drowning Pool stretching back many years and everyone in the small town has a theory or something to hide.

One thing I found overly complicated about this book was the amount of characters and viewpoints. Usually you will read a book from a few characters’ point-of-view but this had a huge amount of characters. I often got confused about which character’s point-of-view I was reading. Also, none of the characters are particularly likeable so I didn’t exactly care what happened to any of them.

But I am glad that I persevered with Into the Water because once I had sorted out all the characters and different strands of the plot it did start to get interesting. I think you need to be in the right frame of mind to read this book. If you are wanting your next read to be easy, light and a page turner then this isn’t the book for you.

Verdict: A book that is a hard slog at first but worth getting to the end of.

What’s a book you read that was hard to get into but was worth finishing?

The Dry by Jane Harper review

cover image of The Dry by Jane Harper
The Dry by Jane Harper, ISBN 9781925481372, 339pp

If you’re reading a crime novel set in a small Australian country town you can be sure of a few things: the story will take place against a harsh, unforgiving natural landscape; there will be a bevy of local characters with secrets to hide–from hard-drinking farmers to small town gossips; everyone will know everyone in town and there will be a couple of long standing feuds; and there will be something bad that happened in the past which is somehow connected to this latest crime. That’s not to say that these books aren’t a pleasure to read, I just often see this pattern.

Perhaps that’s why it took me so long to pick up The Dry by Jane Harper. It was the book on everyone’s lips in 2016, winning rave reviews from critics and racing up the bestsellers chart. Booksellers and book lovers embraced this debut and you would have had to be living under a rock to not have heard about it. It has also been optioned for the screen by Reese Witherspoon. Even now, The Dry is still picking up accolades, the recent being Jane Harper winning the British Crime Writers’ Association Gold Dagger award for the best crime novel of the year. Continue reading