The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood Review

The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood Review
The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood, ISBN 9780099511663, 324pp

I recently did a reread of The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood. I read this many years ago and had pretty much forgotten everything. But the TV series was fresh in my memory. I wanted to do a reread before moving on to the sequel The Testaments. I was once again blown away by this powerful book. It’s a book with themes that are scary because they are so plausible. Continue reading

Sanditon by Jane Austen Review

Sanditon by Jane Austen book review
Sanditon by Jane Austen, Penguin English Library edition, ISBN 97802414333713, 196pp

Reading Sanditon by Jane Austen sent me off on a week long reading and viewing journey. Firstly, Sanditon is only 12 chapters long (Austen died before finishing this book) which was not long enough for me. I loved what I read and I wanted more!

In 12 chapters a whole host of characters are introduced and already the book sparkled with Austen’s wit. At the heart of the book is Charlotte Heywood – a young woman who lives in a tiny country town with her many brothers and sisters. One day a gentleman and his wife, the Parkers, suffer a carriage mishap and the Heywoods take them in. Continue reading

The Scapegoat by Daphne du Maurier Review

The Scapegoat by Daphne du Maurier review
The Scapegoat by Daphne du Maurier, ISBN 9781844080977, 373pp

I’m slowly reading my way through all of Daphne du Maurier’s books. I find that Daphne books all have such intriguing premises. The Scapegoat is about two physically identical strangers who meet by chance. One man is an English academic called John who is touring around France. He’s depressed and dissatisfied with his life. John has little in his life apart from his job as a historian giving lectures about French history. The other stranger is a charming Frenchman named Jean.

John drinks too much with his doppelganger and wakes up to find all his belongings missing – clothes, car, wallet, id. His identity has been stolen and in its place is Jean’s clothes and id. Continue reading

The House on the Strand by Daphne du Maurier Review

The House on the Strand by Daphne du Maurier
The House on the Strand by Daphne du Maurier, ISBN 9781844080427, 329pp

Last October I asked my husband for a whole stack of Daphne du Maurier books for my birthday. I’ve been reading my way through them slowly, discovering old favourites I haven’t read for years, as well as Daphne du Maurier books I previously knew nothing about. The House on the Strand is one of those books I knew little about before reading. I went in without expectations and was pleasantly surprised by this novel. It’s a time travel book, but written in such an original way. I found it fascinating. It has firmly cemented Daphne du Maurier in my eyes as an author who was the master of any genre. Continue reading

My Cousin Rachel by Daphne du Maurier Review

My Cousin Rachel by Daphne du Maurier review
My Cousin Rachel by Daphne du Maurier, ISBN 9781844080403, 335pp

My Cousin Rachel by Daphne du Maurier is a book I’ve been wanting to read for a long time. As part of my quest to read more Daphne du Maurier books this year, I finally got around to reading it.

The story is written from the perspective of Philip Ashley, a young man on the cusp of turning twenty-five who has a lot to learn about the world and a lot of maturing to do. Philip was raised by his cousin, Ambrose, after the death of his parents, and grows up on a beautiful estate in Cornwall. But Ambrose suffers from ill-health so must spend the winter months over in Italy where it’s warm. Continue reading

The Hound of the Baskervilles Review

The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle review
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle, ISBN 978014199177, 189pp

One of my reading goals for 2019 is to read more classics. Last year I planned to read a huge pile of classics but unfortunately only ended up reading a handful of books in this category. This year I’m determined to read as many of my classics as I can.  The Hounds of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle is my second classic novel of the year. It features the wonderfully eccentric, brilliant Sherlock Holmes and his sidekick Dr Watson. Continue reading

Frenchman’s Creek by Daphne du Maurier Review

Frenchman's Creek by Daphne du Maurier review
Frenchman’s Creek by Daphne du Maurier, ISBN 9780349006598, 272 pp

Frenchman’s Creek by Daphne du Maurier is my first read of 2019. I read this a long time ago, so was happy to do a re-read as I had forgotten most of the plot. I’m so glad that I read this again as it was a fantastic read which I enjoyed so much.

Frenchman’s Creek is a rollicking, swashbuckling adventure set during the Restoration period in England. Lady Dona St Columb, the mother of two small children, is fed up with the shallow life she leads at Court. She is known for being a daring woman who drinks with her husband, his friends and their mistresses and is known to engage in wild escapades. Continue reading

My 2019 Bookish Resolutions

My penguin clothbound classics

Happy New Year everyone! In 2018 I read 105 books. I enjoyed reading books across many different genres from YA to historical fiction to romance. In 2019 I want to read more books from my unread shelf. I have so many books that have been waiting patiently for my attention, many of them classics, and this is the year that I want to get stuck into them.

Last year I set myself the challenge of reading 60 books and ended up blowing that goal out of the water. But classics take me a bit more time to read than modern books. For that reason I’m going to set my goal at 70 books this year so I don’t feel too much pressure.

Books that are on my to be read pile in 2019 include:

Classics on my shelf that I want to read

Continue reading