Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier Review

Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier review
Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier, ISBN 9781844080380, 441pp

I just re-read Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier for the first time in a long time and it’s still an amazing read. It made me into a Daphne du Maurier fangirl all over again. Sometimes when I re-read a book I feel differently about it but with this book I was left with so much appreciation of Daphne du Maurier’s skill as a writer. Rebecca is truly a masterful piece of writing. It’s easy to see why this book has become a classic that has never gone out of print. Continue reading

The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy Review

The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy review
The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy, ISBN 9780241341339, 275pp, June 2018 Penguin English Library edition

If you’re looking for a classic that’s great fun, swashbuckling and has a mysterious hero at its heart then The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy is the book for you. Where else can you find a group of dashing Englishmen led by the Scarlet Pimpernel who rescue French aristocrats from the guillotine during the French revolution and say things like “Zooks!,” “Demmed excitable little puppy” and “Odd’s fish.”

The beauty of this book is that no one knows the identity of the dashing Scarlet Pimpernel, but the French are desperate to find out who has been performing these miraculous rescues that make them look like fools. After each rescue they find his calling card marked with a red flower, the Scarlet Pimpernel… Like the French agents, the reader has to guess the Scarlet Pimpernel’s identity. Continue reading

When Life Gives You Lululemons by Lauren Weisberger Review

When Life Gives You Lululemons Review
When Life Gives You Lululemons by Lauren Weisberger, ISBN 9780008303679, 410pp

When Life Gives You Lululemons by Lauren Weisberger is an entertaining, easy to digest read. It’s the third book by Weisberger to feature the character Emily Charlton (you might remember her as Miranda Priestley’s prickly first assistant from The Devil Wears Prada). In this book Emily finds herself in the upscale suburb of Greenwich where the mums throw sex toy parties, get designer vaginas after giving birth and run around in Lululemon activewear.

Emily is in Greenwich visiting an old friend, Miriam, who used to be a high-flying New York lawyer but is now a stay-at-home-mum of three and trying to navigate the outrageous waters of Greenwich. Continue reading

20 Bookish Problems That All Bookworms Understand

bookworm problem mismatched books
When your book series is not the same size

I’m always talking about how much I love books. But like everyone else, sometimes I get annoyed by the little things. These bookish problems are certainly not the end of the world but some days they can make me go aargh!

Today in the spirit of getting them off my chest, I’m listing my bookish pet peeves.  So here they are in no particular order: Continue reading

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr Review

All the Light We Cannot See Review
All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr, ISBN 9780007548699, 531pp

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doer is a book I’ve been hearing about for ages that everyone raves about. So when I saw it in a second-hand bookstore recently, I just had to grab it. My expectations were huge going in to read this book and I have to say that it mostly lived up to all the hype.

Set during World War II it tells the story of a young, blind French girl named Marie-Laure who must navigate war-torn France and all its dangers without being able to see them. Her father works at the Museum of Natural History in Paris and helps Marie-Laure find her way around by carving a replica of the city streets for her to memorise. Continue reading

Pachinko by Min Jin Lee Review

Pachinko by Min Jin Lee book review
Pachinko by Min Jin Lee, ISBN 9781786691378, 537pp

I have struggled for a few weeks to find a good book to get into. I kept starting books and then abandoning them. I don’t think it was the books at fault, just my own strange reading mood. Then I picked up Pachinko by Min Jin Lee and suddenly I was back into reading. I couldn’t put this book down until I had made it to the end.

Pachinko is a historical fiction saga that takes place over a few generations of a Korean family living in Japan. Starting in South Korea in 1911 in a fishing village in Yeongdo, it moves through to Osaka in Japan and the Second World War and finishes up in Tokyo in 1989. Continue reading

The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart Review

The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart review
The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart by Holly Ringland, ISBN 9781460754337, 388pp

The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart by Holly Ringland is a gorgeous book inside and out. The cover is to die for and inside the book each chapter is named after a different wild flower and accompanied by a stunning illustration. Even if you never read this book, you’d want to own it based purely on its visual loveliness. So it’s good to know that it’s also a wonderful story.

This debut novel tells the story of Alice Hart, a young girl whose childhood is marred by a terrible tragedy that sees her mother, father and dog killed in a fire. Up until this point, Alice has grown up isolated on a property under the thumb of her abusive father. Alice is emotionally scarred by all that she has been through. Continue reading

Why I Changed My Opinion About YA Books

Why I changed my opinion about YA books
My growing collection of YA books

Until recently I wasn’t a huge Young Adult (YA) book fan. Don’t get me wrong, I still read books like The Hunger Games trilogy and the Twilight series but I mostly did this because the popularity of both of these series was too huge to ignore. Even my husband and my dad read and loved The Hunger Games. But I thought these books were an anomaly that transcended their intended audience. Gosh, what did I know?

I didn’t read YA books because as an adult I assumed these books were too juvenile for me. I didn’t even read books in this category when I was a teenager. At about age twelve I just jumped straight to reading all the adult books on my parents’ book shelves. Continue reading