The Giver of Stars by Jojo Moyes Review

The Giver of Stars by Jojo Moyes Review
The Giver of Stars by Jojo Moyes, ISBN 9780718183233, 440pp

Regular readers of my blog will know how much I love anything written by Jojo Moyes. So I was excited to get my hands on her latest release The Giver Of Stars. I pretty much devoured this historical fiction book set in 1930s Kentucky in a day. I just couldn’t put it down!

Set in Baileyville, Kentucky, during the Depression, it tells the story of a remarkable group of women who form part of the WPA’s horseback mobile librarian programme – bringing books and reading to people living in remote mountain areas.

Though the characters in this book are fictional, they are inspired by the real life women who took part in this scheme which ran from 1935 to 1943. Jojo weaves a fascinating tale of a small community where many welcome the spread of books and reading, while others oppose the idea of women promoting literacy. Continue reading

Night Music by Jojo Moyes Review

Night Music by Jojo Moyes book and review
Night Music by Jojo Moyes, ISBN 9780340895955, 407pp

Night Music by Jojo Moyes joins a fast growing list of books I’ve read by Jojo. It all started when my husband decided to add to the few Moyes books in my collection by tracking down second-hand copies of her other books. Now I have ten of her books!

Night MusicĀ is a story about grief, family, music and house renovations. Isabel Delaney is a recently widowed violinist with two children. She’s always taken a backseat in parenting as she was travelling around playing in orchestras while her husband looked after the kids. Following his death, she finds out that her family is in a mountain of debt and they can no longer afford their mortgage or the children’s nanny. Continue reading

Foreign Fruit by Jojo Moyes Review

Foreign Fruit by Jojo Moyes Review
Foreign Fruit by Jojo Moyes, ISBN 9780340834145, 483pp

Jojo Moyes is an automatic buy author for me. Foreign Fruit has been sitting on my bookshelf for quite some time, so I was happy to finally get around to reading it. Set in the 1950s and present day (early 2000s), Foreign Fruit takes place in the seaside town of Merham. It’s a place where people don’t like change — even when it’s greatly needed.

In the 1950s section of the book we meet two friends: Lottie Swift and Celia Holden. Lottie came to live with the respectable Holden family when London was evacuated during the war and then never went back to live with her mother. Continue reading

The Scapegoat by Daphne du Maurier Review

The Scapegoat by Daphne du Maurier review
The Scapegoat by Daphne du Maurier, ISBN 9781844080977, 373pp

I’m slowly reading my way through all of Daphne du Maurier’s books. I find that Daphne books all have such intriguing premises. The Scapegoat is about two physically identical strangers who meet by chance. One man is an English academic called John who is touring around France. He’s depressed and dissatisfied with his life. John has little in his life apart from his job as a historian giving lectures about French history. The other stranger is a charming Frenchman named Jean.

John drinks too much with his doppelganger and wakes up to find all his belongings missing – clothes, car, wallet, id. His identity has been stolen and in its place is Jean’s clothes and id. Continue reading

Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens Review

Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens book review
Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens, ISBN 9781472154651, 368pp

I’m a bit late to the reading party for Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens. I’ve been wanting to read it for a while, only I was afraid it wouldn’t live up to all the hype. But as soon as I started this book I knew I was in for a treat. I devoured it over a couple of days and loved every minute of it. The writing was superb, I was 100% invested in the story, and it made me feel so many emotions. All in all it was a 5 star read for me. It’s one of those rare books that reads like a classic and you know it will endure with time. I loved it! Continue reading

The Au Pair by Emma Rous Review

The Au Pair by Emma Rous book review
The Au Pair by Emma Rous, ISBN 9780349419091, 406pp

The Au Pair by Emma Rous is a book I borrowed from my mum. Set in England, it’s a mystery with lots of twists and turns. Seraphine Mayes and her twin brother Danny are known as the summer-born Summerbournes: the first set of summer twins to be born at Summerbourne House. But on the day they are born, their mother throws herself to her death, the au pair of the older sibling Edwin flees from the house, and the village is full of whispers of cloaked figures and a stolen baby.

Now twenty-five and mourning the death of her father, Seraphine uncovers a photo from the day of her birth that shows her parents posing with just one baby. Is it Seraphine or Danny? And where is the other twin? Seraphine becomes fixated with the mystery of her birth and can’t shake the thought that something is not quite right. So she sets off to investigate, opening a whole vault of secrets that someone doesn’t want uncovered. Continue reading

The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides Review

The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides Book Review
The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides, ISBN 9781409181620, 339pp

I borrowed The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides from my mum after seeing it everywhere and reading that it hit number one on the New York Times bestseller list. It’s a debut thriller set in England.

It’s about — funnily enough — a silent patient named Alicia Berenson and a forensic psychotherapist called Theo Faber who is determined to get her to talk.

Alicia is an artist, happily married, but not without her issues. Until one day she shoots her husband Gabriel five times for no apparent reason. She refuses to say why and doesn’t utter another word. She ends up being put into a mental care facility called The Grove which is where she meets Theo. Continue reading

A Lifetime of Impossible Days by Tabitha Bird Review

A Lifetime of Impossible Days Tabitha Bird Book Review
A Lifetime of Impossible Days by Tabitha Bird, ISBN 9780143792260, 395pp

A Lifetime of Impossible Days by Tabitha Bird tells the unforgettable story of Willa Waters aged eight, 33 and 93. In 1965, eight-year-old Willa receives a mysterious box. Inside is a jar of water and the instructions: ‘One ocean: plant in the backyard.’ In doing so, Willa creates a time portal that allows her to visit her future selves.

In 1990, Willa is 33, a wife and the mother of two small boys. She’s dealing with dark memories from her tragic childhood. When she encounters her eight-year-old self in the garden it sends her spiralling out of control.

Continue reading